Determining the Credibility of Evidence and Resources



Determining the Credibility of Evidence and Resources
QUESTION
Develop a 2-4 page scholarly paper in which you describe a quality or safety issue, or a chosen diagnosis, and then identify and analyze credible evidence that could be used as the basis for applying EBP to the issue.
Determining the Credibility of Evidence and Resources

ANSWER
Determining the Credibility of Evidence and Resources

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Determining the Credibility of Evidence and Resources
The healthcare environment is ever-changing, and credible evidence is crucial to back choices for solutions to common errors. Healthcare workers use diverse platforms to find data that helps them make informed decisions regarding the solutions. One of the safety issues in healthcare is medication error, which causes more deaths than most in the U.S. A medication error is a preventable effect of a patient taking the wrong medication, resulting in serious effects, including death. Medication errors have plagued the health industry, leading multiple researchers to find credible solutions appropriate for every problem. For these reasons, this paper explores medication errors as a healthcare issue and analyzes evidence that could be used as the basis for applying evidence-based practice measures.
A medication error is any adverse drug event that anyone could have avoided. These errors could result from adverse drug reactions, adverse drug events, medication misadventure, and a high-risk event that could lead to death (Tariq et al., 2022). Several sources recognize that medication errors occur at strategic points, including during ordering or prescription, documentation, transcription, dispensation, administration, and monitoring, especially in in-patient services. System failures that result in medication errors are inaccurate transcriptions of orders, poor dissemination of drug knowledge, failure on the healthcare provider’s part to obtain allergy history from patients, incomplete or poor checking of orders, poor tracking of medication, lack of communication from the healthcare provides, and lack of patient information.
Several reasons could cause these errors, among them the incorrect duration of intervals when administering the medication, which may be too long or too short compared to the desired time, incorrect preparation resulting in incorrect reconstituted strengths, incorrect administration of strengths due to similar syringes and bottling, incorrect rates of administration, especially for intravenously administered drugs, incorrect timing when administering scheduled doses, leading to an altered absorption rate, incorrect dosage form, and incorrect patient action especially when a patient takes the medication in a way other than the prescribed way (Tariq et al., 2022). Solutions to medication errors target the causative areas, and many researchers have sought solutions based on existing evidence.
Kavanagh, C. (2017). Medication governance: Preventing errors and promoting patient safety. British Journal of Nursing, 26(3), 159-165. https://doi.org/10.12968/bjon.2017.26.3.159/

This article is from the National Library of Medicine, which contains more than thirty-three million works of biomedical literature from scientific journals, books, and other material.
This article recognizes medication errors occur at a significant rate and identifies potential issues and the support system required to prevent them from happening. The author identifies the nurse’s role as paramount in preventing medication errors. The researcher explores methods like nurse accountability, education on medicines, and nurse educators to prevent medication errors. Additionally, the researcher also found that reporting errors were crucial to prevent future errors and seek solutions to those that occurred. Learning was also a method of preventing future errors, and a culture of safety was even more effective than culture without it. This article is thus relevant as it identifies the areas where specific errors occur and offers solutions.

Mieiro, D. B., Oliveira, É. B., Fonseca, R. E., Mininel, V. A., Zem-Mascarenhas, S. H., & Machado, R. C. (2019). Strategies to minimize medication errors in emergency units: An integrative review. Revista Brasileira de Enfermagem, 72(suppl 1), 307-314. https://doi.org/10.1590/0034-7167-2017-0658/

This article is from the National Library of Medicine, which contains more than thirty-three million works of biomedical literature from scientific journals, books, and other material.
This article assesses the methods used by the nurses to reduce medication errors in emergency rooms. The authors did a literature search of published articles in full answering strategies to deal with medication errors. There was no time or language limit. Mineiro and her colleagues found that the nurses used several strategies, which they grouped into educational strategies, organizational strategies, and new technologies, to overcome medication errors. The strategies ranged from conducting campaigns to creating protocols to implementing a computerized prescription system, among others. The results were that these strategies reduced medication errors in emergency units. This article is thus relevant to provide insight into the causes of medication errors and recognize human error as the main cause of medication errors.

Schepel, L., Aronpuro, K., Kvarnström, K., Holmström, A., Lehtonen, L., Lapatto-Reiniluoto, O., Laaksonen, R., Carlsson, K., & Airaksinen, M. (2019). Strategies for improving medication safety in hospitals: Evolution of clinical pharmacy services. Research in Social and Administrative Pharmacy, 15(7), 873-882. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sapharm.2019.02.004/

This source is from Elsevier, a global leader in informatics and analytics.
The authors recognize medication errors, as they are the most preventable risks that put patient safety in harm’s way. Medication errors occurred during dispensation. They explore safety strategies by extending the involvement of pharmacists in patient care and safety. They conducted the study countrywide in Finish hospitals and found out that in the hospitals that involved pharmacists in patient care, errors resulting from medication dispensation got resolved through the increase in the number of production units, development of instructions for medication use, creation and updating medication safety plans, and using medication error reports. Healthcare workers resolved most systemic errors at each point of occurrence. Pharmacists’ participation in continuous education also reduced medication errors. This article is thus relevant to provide strategies for dealing with medication errors in clinical setups.

Yin, H. S., Neuspiel, D. R., Paul, I. M., Franklin, W., Tieder, J. S., Adirim, T., Alvarez, F., Brown, J. M., Bundy, D. G., Ferguson, L. E., Gleeson, S. P., Leu, M., Mueller, B. U., Connor Phillips, S., Quinonez, R. A., Rea, C., Rinke, M. L., Shaikh, U., Shiffman, R. N., Vickers Saarel, E., … Verhoef, P. A. (2021). Preventing Home Medication Administration Errors. American Academy of Pediatrics, 148(6), e2021054666. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2021-054666

This article is from the National Library of Medicine, which contains more than thirty-three million works of biomedical literature from scientific journals, books, and other material.
The authors recognized the existence of medication errors in home settings, especially when caregivers used liquid medication and complex medication administration schedules with multiple medications were involved. The most affected population was children with chronic conditions. The authors found that parents or other caregivers with low literacy were the main sources of medication errors. Strategies used related to provider prescribing practices include, but are not limited to, health literacy and informed verbal consent; written patient instruction materials; dosing tool to measure liquid medication; review of medication list with patients or caregivers; and training of home care providers. These strategies target human error medication errors that occur at home. Collectively, they involve patient medication education. The article is thus relevant to providing strategies for reducing patient medication errors.
The above articles thus provide insight into the different ways medication errors occur, and propose solutions that worked for each healthcare setting. 
References
Kavanagh, C. (2017). Medication governance: Preventing errors and promoting patient safety. British Journal of Nursing, 26(3), 159-165. https://doi.org/10.12968/bjon.2017.26.3.159
Mieiro, D. B., Oliveira, É. B., Fonseca, R. E., Mininel, V. A., Zem-Mascarenhas, S. H., & Machado, R. C. (2019). Strategies to minimize medication errors in emergency units: An integrative review. Revista Brasileira de Enfermagem, 72(suppl 1), 307-314. https://doi.org/10.1590/0034-7167-2017-0658
Schepel, L., Aronpuro, K., Kvarnström, K., Holmström, A., Lehtonen, L., Lapatto-Reiniluoto, O., Laaksonen, R., Carlsson, K., & Airaksinen, M. (2019). Strategies for improving medication safety in hospitals: Evolution of clinical pharmacy services. Research in Social and Administrative Pharmacy, 15(7), 873-882. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sapharm.2019.02.004
Tariq, R. A., Vashisht, R., Sinha, A., & Scherbak, Y. (2022, April 4). Medication dispensing errors and prevention – StatPearls – NCBI bookshelf. National Center for Biotechnology Information. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK519065/

Yin, H. S., Neuspiel, D. R., Paul, I. M., Franklin, W., Tieder, J. S., Adirim, T., Alvarez, F., Brown, J. M., Bundy, D. G., Ferguson, L. E., Gleeson, S. P., Leu, M., Mueller, B. U., Connor Phillips, S., Quinonez, R. A., Rea, C., Rinke, M. L., Shaikh, U., Shiffman, R. N., Vickers Saarel, E., … Verhoef, P. A. (2021). Preventing Home Medication Administration Errors. American Academy of Pediatrics, 148(6), e2021054666. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2021-054666

Determining the Credibility of Evidence and Resources


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