Assignment: Digestive Disorders Exam



Assignment: Digestive Disorders Exam

Assignment: Digestive Disorders Exam

Many patient symptoms can be tied to multiple disorders, which may lead to misdiagnoses. For instance, consider two digestive disorders of the gastrointestinal tract—inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome. These two disorders are commonly confused because they present similar symptoms. As an advanced practice nurse, you must know the differences to properly diagnose and treat the disorders. How does the pathophysiology of inflammatory bowel disease compare to the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome? How do treatments for the two disorders compare?

To Prepare

Review Chapter 36 in the Huether and McCance text and Chapter 13 in the McPhee and Hammer text.
Identify the pathophysiological mechanisms of inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome. Think about similarities and differences between the disorders.
Consider common treatments for inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome. Reflect on whether treatments for one disorder would work for the other disorder.
Select one of the following patient factors: genetics, gender, ethnicity, age, or behavior. Reflect on how the factor you selected might impact the pathophysiology of and treatments for each disorder.
Post an explanation of the pathophysiological mechanisms of inflammatory bowel disorder and irritable bowel syndrome, including similarities and differences. Then describe common treatments, addressing whether treatments for one disorder would work for the other disorder. Finally, explain how the patient factor you selected might impact the pathophysiology of and treatments for each disorder.

Required Readings

**Huether, S. E., & McCance, K. L. (2017). Understanding pathophysiology (6th ed.). St. Louis, MO: Mosby.

Chapter 35, “Structure and Function of the Digestive System”
This chapter provides information relating to the structure and function of the digestive system. It covers the gastrointestinal tract and accessory organs of digestion.

Chapter 36, “Alterations of Digestive Function”
This chapter presents information relating to disorders of the gastrointestinal tract and accessory organs of digestion. It also covers the pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, evaluation, and treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease, gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, inflammatory bowel disease, and irritable bowel syndrome.

Chapter 37, “Alterations of Digestive Function in Children”
This chapter presents information relating to disorders of the gastrointestinal tract and liver that affect children. It focuses on congenital impairment, inflammatory disorders, metabolic disorders, as well as the impairment of digestion, absorption, and nutrition.

**Hammer, G. G. , & McPhee, S. (2014). Pathophysiology of disease: An introduction to clinical medicine. (7th ed.) New York, NY: McGraw-Hill Education.

Chapter 13, “Gastrointestinal Disease”
This chapter provides a foundation for exploring gastrointestinal disorders by reviewing the structure and function of the GI tract. It also describes mechanisms of regulation of GI tract disorders such as acid-peptic disease, inflammatory bowel disease, and irritable bowel syndrome.

Chapter 14, “Liver Disease”
This chapter reviews the structure and function of the liver. It then explores the clinical presentation, etiology, pathogenesis, pathology, and clinical manifestations of three liver disorders: acute hepatitis, chronic hepatitis, and cirrhosis.

Chapter 15, “Disorders of the Exocrine Pancreas”
This chapter begins by reviewing the anatomy, histology, and physiology of the exocrine pancreas. It then examines the clinical presentation, etiology, pathology, pathogenesis, and clinical manifestations of acute and chronic pancreatitis, pancreatic insufficiency, and pancreatic cancer.

**de Bortoli, N., Martinucci, I., Bellini, M., Savarino, E., Savarino, V., Blandizzi, C., & Marchi, S. (2013). Overlap of functional heartburn and gastroesophageal reflux disease with irritable bowel syndrome. World Journal of Gastroenterology, 19(35), 5787-5797. doi:10.3748/wjg.v19.i35.5787

– This work should have Introduction and Conclusion

– It should have at least 3 current references (Year 2013 and up)

The following Resources are not acceptable:

1. Wikipedia

2. Cdc.gov- nonhealthcare professionals section

3. Webmd.com

4. Mayoclinic.com

Assignment: Digestive Disorders Exam

Assignment: Digestive Disorders Exam

You must proofread your paper. But do not strictly rely on your computer’s spell-checker and grammar-checker; failure to do so indicates a lack of effort on your part and you can expect your grade to suffer accordingly. Papers with numerous misspelled words and grammatical mistakes will be penalized. Read over your paper – in silence and then aloud – before handing it in and make corrections as necessary. Often it is advantageous to have a friend proofread your paper for obvious errors. Handwritten corrections are preferable to uncorrected mistakes.

Use a standard 10 to 12 point (10 to 12 characters per inch) typeface. Smaller or compressed type and papers with small margins or single-spacing are hard to read. It is better to let your essay run over the recommended number of pages than to try to compress it into fewer pages.

Likewise, large type, large margins, large indentations, triple-spacing, increased leading (space between lines), increased kerning (space between letters), and any other such attempts at “padding” to increase the length of a paper are unacceptable, wasteful of trees, and will not fool your professor.

The paper must be neatly formatted, double-spaced with a one-inch margin on the top, bottom, and sides of each page. When submitting hard copy, be sure to use white paper and print out using dark ink. If it is hard to read your essay, it will also be hard to follow your argument.


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