An Advanced Practice Nurse (APRN)



An Advanced Practice Nurse (APRN)
QUESTION
Compare the primary care Nurse Practitioner role with other Advanced Practice Nursing roles. What are the similarities among the roles, what are the differences, and how would you communicate the role to a healthcare provider and a consumer?

Submission Instructions:
Your initial post should be at least 500 words, formatted and cited in current APA style with support from at least 2 academic sources (must be from 2018-2022). Your initial post is worth 8 points.

An Advanced Practice Nurse (APRN)

ANSWER
Discussion 2

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Discussion 2
An Advanced Practice Nurse (APRN)is a nurse that ranks near the top of the nursing ladder. They hold a master’s degree or doctorate in a specific nursing area. There are several types of advanced practice registered nurses that operate within a patient population. They can assess, diagnose, can prescribe medication, and manage patient problems. A primary care Nurse Practitioner (NP) is a nurse with a master’s degree or relevant post-graduate degree in nursing who is certified and licensed to practice in a specific field within their scope.
A Nurse Practitioner has a minimum of a master’s degree in a nursing role, and an APRN has a master’s or a doctorate degree in a nursing specific area (“APRN vs. NP – What’s the difference?” 2021). They first need a certification to show they are registered, have a minimum of recent clinical hours of practice, and a bachelor’s degree in nursing.
An NP shares many of the required skills and educational requirements with an APRN, but each has a specific patient population they specialize in. NPs’ duties are to assess, diagnose, and treat acute and chronic illnesses (ANA, n.d.). Some states act as the primary care provider and even provide referrals to patients for specialized care. The duties of an APRN vary depending on the chosen specialty and state. Still, they are primarily responsible for diagnosing and treating acute and chronic illnesses, providing preventative services, and ordering lab tests. Some states allow them to prescribe medication and practice independently (“APRN vs. NP – What’s the difference?” 2021). APRNs have four major career tasks as clinical nurse specialist, can be nurse anesthetist with certification and registration, nurse-midwife with certification, and nurse practitioners. NPs have several specialty areas in acute care, family, pediatric, women’s health, and psychiatric and mental health.
NPs have specific practice settings, including ambulatory and community clinics, long-term care facilities, and private medical practice. In contrast, APRNs can practice in any healthcare setting like hospitals and private clinics.
The licensing and certification for NP depend on the specialty area, and the American Nurses Credentialing Center or the American Association of Nurse Practitioners certifies them (Chron contributor, 2021). Additionally, they need the state board of nursing to certify their licenses. However, APRNs have to get licensure from their states, the American Association of Nurse Practitioners, or any other licensing body that aligns with their specific scope of practice.
Continuing education requirements for NP are that they have to reapply for certification every five years, have a minimum of a thousand clinical hours within the last five years, and seventy-five contact hours of relevant continuing education, while for APRNs, vary depending on the state and specialty.
Prescriptive roles of NP vary depending on the type of medication and supervision level. NPs in all states can prescribe antibiotics, narcotics, and other Schedule II drugs like Adderall, but the supervision level depends on the authority of each state. Similarly, the prescriptive roles of APRNs rely on the state they are licensed to practice and their specialization.
Communicating the role to a healthcare worker or consumer involves practical communication skills of verbal communication, non-verbal communication, active listening, written communication, and patient education. These skills deliver the required information in the proper context while considering the cultural nuances, personal connections, trust, and compassion that drive any form of communication “importance of effective communication in nursing,” 2021). Additionally, they enable individuals to overcome physical, social, and psychological barriers during nursing practice. 
References
ANA. (n.d.). Advanced practice registered nurses (APRN) | American Nurses Association. https://www.nursingworld.org/practice-policy/workforce/what-is-nursing/aprn/
APRN vs NP – What’s the difference? (2021, October). Nursing License Map. https://nursinglicensemap.com/advanced-practice-nursing/nurse-practitioner/aprn-vs-np/
Chron contributor. (2021, January 19). Advanced practice nurses vs. nurse practitioners. Work – Chron.com. https://work.chron.com/advanced-practice-nurses-vs-nurse-practitioners-13968.html
The importance of effective communication in nursing. (2021, April 29). University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences. https://www.usa.edu/blog/communication-in-nursing/

An Advanced Practice Nurse (APRN)


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