Addiction to alcohol



Addiction to alcohol

QUESTION
As highlighted by the text, “A wide range of factors may predispose individuals to addiction, many of which provide insights into the etiology of the disorder.” Reflecting on the vulnerability factors as they relate to your life (review pages 11-20 of the text for an overview of key dimensions), to what extent is addiction a concern for you? Share your thoughts in a reflective journal that addresses the following:
alcohol
What factors which make you more vulnerable to addiction?
What aspects of your life may shield you from potential addictions?
What addiction vulnerability factors are within your control?
What indicators exist in your life to provide insight as to whether you are more or less likely to develop substance addictions?
Assignment Expectations:

Length: 1000-1250 words

Addiction to alcohol

ANSWER
Reflective journal

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Addiction to alcohol
People who drink excessively are at risk for many health problems, contributing to the global burden of disease. More than 30 illnesses are linked to alcohol abuse. Toxicology studies have shown that alcohol is responsible for a wide range of health problems, including chronic conditions such as cancer and diabetes and psychiatric diseases such as alcohol use disorders. Other people may suffer due to excessive alcohol consumption and the entire cost of drinking. Addiction to alcohol consumption, just like many other addictions, is caused by alcohol use disorder. This is a condition that alcohol creates in the brain to link the positive dopamine chemical that alcohol is constantly rewarding. However, it opens ways to other factors such as tolerance and withdrawal symptoms that cause more profound addiction.
Factors that Make an Individual Vulnerable to alcohol addiction
Excessive drinking can endanger the lives of those with alcohol use disorders as well as those around them. Adults can safely have two drinks a day. Many alcoholics can’t stop drinking because of their abuse (Wardell et al., 2020). Why are some people prone to addiction? Biological and environmental factors increase alcoholism risk. Genetics accounts for 40-60% of all potential addiction risks. Individuals should decide for themselves if they will use drugs, even if a family member struggled with addiction.
Early drug use increases a person’s risk of later addiction. People whose brain development has been influenced by drug or alcohol use are more prone to addiction (Gowin et al., 2017). Mental illness increases addiction risk. Depression, anxiety, and ADD/ADHD all contribute to the development of mental illness. Mental health patients often abuse drugs because they believe they’ll feel better. Gender is another factor in alcohol and drug abuse susceptibility. According to a new study, women are more likely to take anxiety and sleeplessness drugs, while men smoke marijuana and drink alcohol.
Family, peer pressure, drug availability, and social stressors all increase addiction risk. Family and friends influence a person’s risk of drug abuse and addiction. Teenagers who lack parental supervision and live in a chaotic household are more susceptible to drug abuse. Mentally ill or drug-addicted parents can also cause family chaos. These parents expose their children to drug abuse and reduce protective factors. Drugs are another factor. Availability is a major research risk. Misusing prescribed medications can cause addiction. Increased stress, social or otherwise, leads to increased drug abuse, especially among young people. Those who have been physically or sexually abused are more prone to addiction. Stress is linked to poverty, and a chaotic lifestyle increases the risk of alcohol abuse. Peer influence also involves engaging in risky behaviors with friends to promote drug use. This exposes and individual like me vulnerable to drug abuse.
Aspects that can Shield you from Drug Abuse
The factors that can shield an individual from drug abuse include high self-esteem, individual religiosity, grit, self-control, parental monitoring, and anti-drug policies. High self-esteem leads to the individual; proper developments of an attitude toward drug abuse; for example, people with high self-esteem believe that they don’t need any drug to boost their esteem and won’t use the drugs. Lack of self-esteem is highly associated with drug abuse and increased crimes(). People with high self-esteem often avoid drugs and can firmly say no if they are prompted to use the drugs. Developing higher self-esteem enables an individual to reduce their drug and alcohol abuse. Higher esteem enables individuals to recognize things they excel in, build positive relationships, be assertive, say no, and give themselves a challenge, including avoidance of drugs.
Religiosity is one of the most strong factors associated with individual abstinence from using alcohol. Evidence has suggested that religiosity strongly affects an individual decision to be a drug user or completely abstain from drug and alcohol abuse. Religious people are less strongly influenced by abuse or dependence on drug and alcohol use. An adult who does not consider the importance of religion becomes more likely to take alcohol and drugs than those who are religious. Hence religiosity is a core factor that influences drug and alcohol abuse. Self-control is another aspect that influences individual choices to use drugs and alcohol, and it is the individual ability to act in sobriety and weighted decision anytime their want to make a decision. Self-control enables temperance and empowers individuals to ensure they do not become victims of the temptations of involving in drug abuse.
Addiction Vulnerability Factors within my Control
One of the key controllable factors that institute vulnerability to drug abuse is peer pressure. As an individual, resisting peer pressure to indulge in drug and alcohol abuse is a significant step in avoiding the road to addiction. Peer pressure may result from one friend who uses alcohol and exposes an individual to such use. Avoid the effects of peer pressures that can lead to addiction; avoiding peer pressure is one essential step. Peer pressure is under my control because it determines the nature of peers and friends I choose with whom we share similar values and opinions. Peer pressure to use drugs and alcohol can arise when an individual needs to be accepted by their peer, prompting them to use the drugs to avoid rejection (Aldridge et al., 2018). Still, it is one of the core areas an individual can practice their power to control their cycle and establish the right friend with shared values.
Availability of drugs is yet another core factor that can lead to individual vulnerability to addiction. It occurs when one is exposed to an environment of the drugs and alcohol and may be tempted to taste them, leading to repeated usage of the drug and alcohol. It is one of the factors under control because it is an individual choice to decide to take alcohol and drugs or not. Every individual puts themselves in a position where they can access anything whenever they want. Thus, avoiding places where alcohol or other drugs are at the individual exposure is a critical step in eliminating vulnerability to addiction. Avoiding these places also ensures that I am exposed to and engaged in other forms of practice that guarantee healthy living. Self-esteem is also a crucial factor; developing individual high self-esteem is essential and enables me to stand firm with the good decision and maintain very high morals within my personality that do not allow for involvement in any form of drug abuse.
Indicators of substance addiction
In matters of drug and alcohol abuse, regardless of how an individual was brought up, several factors have factors within their lives that can indicate whether or not they are likely to be addicted to the drug and substance abuse. One indication that I am less likely to develop substance and alcohol abuse is that I do not repeat attempts to quit alcohol. Quitting alcohol and substance abuse is a not running back step; when an individual keeps going to the substance, it means that they are likely to develop the addiction; maintaining a position of altogether quitting the substance indicates an awareness of the problems of alcohol and substance abuse to an individual and that way, the right step can be taken and maintained as a lifestyle. Avoidance of self-medication is another factor that indicates a less likely chance of developing a drug addiction (Rømer Thomsen et al., 2018). When an individual uses alcohol and other substance during stress or anxiety, they are regarded as dependent on the drugs and substances. An indicator that I am less likely to develop an addiction is that I do not use any drug or substance for self-medication. Besides, do not use any drug or enjoy any substance and uphold high self-control and self-esteem levels.
In conclusion, drug and alcohol abuse because a lot of problems in an individual’s life. It changes their personality behaviors and reduces their motivation in life, such that they become agitated and irritated. Addiction can lead to a lack of proper personal hygiene, and individuals change their daily routines and develop poor health behaviors. Individuals should be educated, trained, counseled, and rehabilitated to reduce the effects of such alcohol and substance abuse in our societies.

References
Aldridge, R. W., Story, A., Hwang, S. W., Nordentoft, M., Luchenski, S. A., Hartwell, G., Tweed, E. J., Lewer, D., Vittal Katikireddi, S., & Hayward, A. C. (2018). Morbidity and mortality in homeless individuals, prisoners, sex workers, and individuals with substance use disorders in high-income countries: A systematic review and meta-analysis. The Lancet, 391(10117), 241–250. https://doi.org/10.1016/s0140-6736(17)31869-x
Gowin, J. L., Sloan, M. E., Stangl, B. L., Vatsalya, V., & Ramchandani, V. A. (2017). Vulnerability for alcohol use disorder and rate of alcohol consumption. American Journal of Psychiatry, 174(11), 1094–1101. https://doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2017.16101180
Rømer Thomsen, K., Callesen, M. B., Hesse, M., Kvamme, T. L., Pedersen, M. M., Pedersen, M. U., & Voon, V. (2018). Impulsivity traits and addiction-related behaviors in Youth. Journal of Behavioral Addictions, 7(2), 317–330. https://doi.org/10.1556/2006.7.2018.22
Wardell, J. D., Kempe, T., Rapinda, K. K., Single, A., Bilevicius, E., Frohlich, J. R., Hendershot, C. S., & Keough, M. T. (2020). Drinking to cope during COVID‐19 pandemic: The role of external and internal factors in coping motive pathways to alcohol use, solitary drinking, and alcohol problems. Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, 44(10), 2073–2083. https://doi.org/10.1111/acer.14425

Addiction to alcohol


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