A 21-year-old male noted pain in his right testicle while studying hard for his midterm college examinations.



A 21-year-old male noted pain in his right testicle while studying hard for his midterm college examinations.
Case Study:Testicular Cancer Assignment

Testicular Cancer

A 21-year-old male noted pain in his right testicle while studying hard for his midterm college examinations. On self-examination, he noted a “grape sized” mass in the right testicle. This finding was corroborated by his healthcare provider. This young man had a history of delayed descent of his right testicle until the age of 1 year old.

Studies and Results

Routine laboratory studies: Within normal limits (WNL)

Ultrasound the testicle: Solid mass, right testicle associated with calcifications

HCG (human chorionic gonadotropin): 550mIU/mL (normal: <5) CT scan of the abdomen: Enlarged retroperitoneal lymph nodes CT scan of the chest: Multiple pulmonary nodules Diagnostic Analysis At semester break, this young man underwent right orchiectomy. Pathology was compatible with embryonal cell carcinoma. CT directed biopsy of the most prominent pulmonary nodule indicated embryonal cell carcinoma, compatible with metastatic testicular carcinoma. During a leave of absence from college, and after banking his sperm, this young man underwent aggressive chemotherapy. Repeat testing 12 weeks after chemotherapy showed complete resolution of the pulmonary nodules and enlarged retroperitoneal lymph nodes. Critical Thinking Questions 1. What impact did an undescended testicle have on this young man’s risk for developing testicular cancer? 2. What might be the side effects of cytotoxic chemotherapy? 3. What was the purpose of preserving his sperm before chemotherapy? 4. Is this young man’s age typical for the development of testicular carcinoma? You must proofread your paper. But do not strictly rely on your computer’s spell-checker and grammar-checker; failure to do so indicates a lack of effort on your part and you can expect your grade to suffer accordingly. Papers with numerous misspelled words and grammatical mistakes will be penalized. Read over your paper – in silence and then aloud – before handing it in and make corrections as necessary. Often it is advantageous to have a friend proofread your paper for obvious errors. Handwritten corrections are preferable to uncorrected mistakes. Use a standard 10 to 12 point (10 to 12 characters per inch) typeface. Smaller or compressed type and papers with small margins or single-spacing are hard to read. It is better to let your essay run over the recommended number of pages than to try to compress it into fewer pages. Likewise, large type, large margins, large indentations, triple-spacing, increased leading (space between lines), increased kerning (space between letters), and any other such attempts at “padding” to increase the length of a paper are unacceptable, wasteful of trees, and will not fool your professor. The paper must be neatly formatted, double-spaced with a one-inch margin on the top, bottom, and sides of each page. When submitting hard copy, be sure to use white paper and print out using dark ink. If it is hard to read your essay, it will also be hard to follow your argument.


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